Legal


If you haven’t already used a solicitor, there’s a good chance at some point in your life where you will require the services of a one.  There are numerous reasons why an individual might seek legal, professional help. There are many different types of solicitors too, each specialising in a particular field, these are as follows: Conveyancing, Personal Injury, Legal Aid, Employment, Commercial, Divorce and also solicitors specialising in Immigration.

Conveyancing Solicitors are veryimportant. They can handle legal transactions for both commercial and residential or private properties. The conveyancing solicitor can make the transactions hassle and stress-free for the client.

There are also solicitors whose expertise is in representing clients in their bid to be compensated for personal injuries experienced. One example would be a compensation for personal injury due to an accident in a public place. These injuries might have been avoided if utmost care had been exercised. The injury might have been caused by tripping or slipping in a slippery floor of a mall or a falling object which was not secured properly. It can also be due to a malfunctioning door or a stampede in a concert. Legal aid is the free or discounted legal assistance provided by the government of UK for those people who are in need of legal advice or representation but cannot afford it.

Solicitors who offer legal aid have the capacity to provide disadvantaged and vulnerable people with means to access legal assistance for the protection of their rights.

Employment Law covers both the employers and employees. For employers, the employment solicitor can provide them with advice about their rights and duties as well as those of their employees. The employees and the employers can benefit from the expertise of these solicitors in terms of conditions on recruitment, working conditions, severance, forced dismissal or redundancy concerns. Divorce solicitors are experts on family as well as matrimonial law. They mostly handle divorce cases and the ramifications of such. Divorce in UK can be very simple to highly complicated ones.

There are also solicitors who deal with immigration issues. They are well versed with immigration, asylum and the other international laws which govern migration. These are the solicitors who handle and process cases regarding the application of family members, partner or other dependents who would like to migrate to UK or to remain in case they are already in the country. They can give advice regarding the documents needed and the procedures governing migration. They can also work on the reapplication for immigrant status in case the previous application was rejected. Furthermore, UK citizens who would like to settle in other countries can also benefit from their services. Trade and commerce require a lot of legal documents.

The commercial solicitors’ work encompasses the different areas of commercial or corporate law. They also do some commercial litigation if necessary.

Wills and Probates Solicitors handle all the legalities relating to the death of a family member. It is a sad event but sometimes it can even become worse if there is no will and testament in sight. Not a lot of people are concerned about wills and testaments and without it, many complications might arise. The will and testament have two main purposes. The first one is to protect the family of the deceased person then the second one is to protect his estate. Children of deceased parents may be placed on welfare because no guardian has been named due to the absence of a will. The family of the deceased person might have no right to whatever will be done to his estate or to his assets because it will be up to the State to decide. Children of unmarried couples may not have the right to inherit the properties. Legal dependents of the deceased might squabble over the estate. It might also be possible that a will was made but it might not be considered valid anymore. For example a man made a will but he got married, the previously written will is deemed invalid because of his marriage. With the assistance of a wills and probate solicitor, the client can make a new will or make some changes on the existing one. He can also provide services aimed to protect the client’s family and estate. He can also set up a trust or arrange for the administration of a client’s estate in case of death. Furthermore, he can also offer probate services such as the death notifications, payment of debts and taxes and the distribution of the assets as provided for in the will.

Whatever the reason for requiring the services of a solicitor, whether it’s legal advise needed to draw up a will, settle a divorce, move house, or resolve employment disputes, or simply to draw up business contracts, there is always a solicitor out there happy to help.

It’s understandable why there are still people out there who feel wary about using a solicitor, considering them to be too expensive and a bit pompous, but trying to do all the legal work yourself could end up in a mess and leave you with all the unpleasant consequences of such actions and of course leave you having to dish out more money in the long term. There’s a reason why it takes 7 years full time studying to become a qualified solicitor.

Err on the side of caution and let the professionals handle your personal and commercial issues. There will be a solicitor out there who you feel comfortable with and meets your financial expectations.

When is it right to sue the NHS?

David Tweedie, Partner in the Clinical Negligence department at Lees Solicitors talks about his findings from years of experience in medical negligence claims against the NHS.

The NHS has been rightly lauded as one of the crowning achievements of the post-War social settlement. It contains hundreds of thousands of highly-skilled, dedicated and caring professionals who are trying to do their best for their patients – and is paid for out of our taxes.

So why is it right to sue the NHS when one of those dedicated staff makes a mistake? After all, they are only human and everyone makes mistakes at one time or another. Is this just another case of lawyers ambulance-chasing and people out to make a quick killing?

Actually, no. I have been working full-time in medical negligence claims for over 20 years and I have acted for hundreds of clients. This is what I have noticed:

Injured patients come to see us very often years after the events – sometimes even too late to claim – and do not rush to see a lawyer at the first opportunity.

  • Many victims cite as one of their motivating factors that they don’t want the same thing to happen to someone else – that the Trust must learn from its errors and one good way to make that happen is to hit it in the pocket.
  • Only about 10,000 claims against NHS Trusts are notified each year – which is far less than the suspected number of adverse incidents (one NHS study suggested that there are in the region of 850,000 adverse incidents per year in NHS hospitals).
  • In many serious cases the motivation is to regain financial security which the victim has lost because they have eg. lost their earning capacity or used up their savings because of their injury, or to achieve such security for their disabled child.
  • Many victims find that the social security and welfare systems are frankly inadequately resourced and cannot meet their needs, leaving the family to provide the required care and support.
  • Some victims feel that they have been brushed aside by the system, that they have not had satisfaction from the NHS complaints procedure and they want to find out what has happened and why.
  • What about the cost to the NHS in both compensation and legal costs? Yes, hospital negligence is eye-wateringly expensive to the taxpayer – £1.25 billion in the last financial year, with some claims for catastrophically injured children settling at figures approaching £10 million, but this must be seen in the context of the overall budget of the NHS of around £108.9 billion.

But the NHS does not pay out compensation unless negligence can be proved, and negligence in law means substandard practice – that is that the defendant Trust’s employees have acted in a way that other members of their profession would condemn as below the acceptable level of competence. So if a claim is successful it means that the NHS has accepted (over 98% of cases do not go to trial) that its patient has been injured because of its incompetence.

Maybe the J-word (justice) is out of fashion these days but many feel that where there has been careless incompetence causing them injury, they have a moral as well as legal right to recompense.

Why not get in touch for a chat with one of our specially trained advisors on 0800 387 927, email newclaim@lees.co.uk or visit our website www.lees.co.uk?

Even the best get it wrong sometimes…

Clinical negligence (also known as medical negligence) occurs when a doctor or other healthcare professional has failed to meet the standards expected of them, and their patient has been harmed as a result.

We at Lees have assisted thousands of patients who have found themselves in this situation. We pride ourselves on knowing how to help.

What Lees Solicitors can do for you…

Help you to claim where negligence has occurred in the fields of medicine, surgery, nursing, chiropody and optometry

  • Dedicated team of lawyers supported by former midwives, nurses and a former doctor
  • Handle the full range of claims up to multi-million pound cases
  • Offer professional, sympathetic and friendly advice
  • Visit you at your home, or out-of-hours if required
  • Male & female solicitors available for sensitive issues

If you, or someone you care about, has been mistreated, contact Lees on 0800 387 927

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